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Cambridge Reproduction SRI

Pregnant woman

Women who experience gestational hypertension are more likely to develop heart disease

23 July 2020

Women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease and heart failure in later life, according to an international team of researchers. Between 1-6% of all pregnancies in Western countries are affected by gestational hypertension, or pregnancy-induced hypertension. Clinicians...

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Gay couple walking together

New research explores gay mens' and lesbians' feelings about possible parenthood

23 July 2020

A new study by Reproduction SRI member Dr Robert Pralat sheds light on how younger gay men and lesbians see the possibility of becoming parents, and suggests that we can think of feelings about parenthood in terms of a 'reproductive orientation', analogous to a sexual orientation. Dr Pralat, a Leverhulme Early Career...

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Gastruloid

New 'model embryos' allow the study of early human development

26 June 2020

Scientists from the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the Hubrecht Institute in The Netherlands, have developed a new model to study an early stage of human development using human embryonic stem cells. Published recently in the journal Nature , the report describes a method of using human embryonic stem cells...

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Chicks (photo: Katie Skeffington)

Chicks hatch clue on life-saving therapy for preterm babies

5 June 2020

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have suggested that subtle changes to the drugs administered to mothers threatened with preterm birth or to premature babies could further improve clinical treatment and help increase their safety. While the current practice of using glucocorticoid therapy shows life-saving...

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Wolf Reik

Professor Wolf Reik receives an ERC Advanced Grant to study crucial developmental process

6 April 2020

New funding awarded to Professor Wolf Reik will support research into how the epigenetic landscape in early development impacts gastrulation, one of the earliest and most important processes in early development. This knowledge will inform strategies for regenerative medicine based on the use of stem cells, and improve our understanding of how developmental disorders arise in humans.

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About us

This Strategic Research Initiative explores the urgent challenges posed by reproduction today.

We facilitate close engagement between the arts, humanities and social sciences, biology and medicine. By approaching reproduction collectively and across disciplines, we offer fresh perspectives on broad issues which range from global policies to those which affect individuals, families and populations.

 

Latest news

New research explores gay mens' and lesbians' feelings about possible parenthood

23 July 2020

A new study by Reproduction SRI member Dr Robert Pralat sheds light on how younger gay men and lesbians see the possibility of becoming parents, and suggests that we can think of feelings about parenthood in terms of a 'reproductive orientation', analogous to a sexual orientation. Dr Pralat, a Leverhulme Early Career...

Women who experience gestational hypertension are more likely to develop heart disease

23 July 2020

Women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease and heart failure in later life, according to an international team of researchers. Between 1-6% of all pregnancies in Western countries are affected by gestational hypertension, or pregnancy-induced hypertension. Clinicians...

Dr Kathy Niakan appointed as next Chair of the Cambridge Reproduction SRI

13 July 2020

We are delighted that Dr Kathy Niakan has been elected to the Mary Marshall and Arthur Walton Professorship of the Physiology of Reproduction from October 2020, and will become the next Chair of the Cambridge Reproduction SRI. Kathy’s research at the Francis Crick Institute in London has focused on studying the mechanisms determining cell fate decisions in the human early embryo, in particular the origin of the trophectoderm lineage.