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Cambridge Reproduction SRI

Human heart

Cambridge scientists awarded £1.3m to unravel how cardiovascular disease is programmed by obese pregnancy

26 April 2021

Congratulations to SRI members Professor Dino Giussani (Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience) and Professor Sue Ozanne (Wellcome-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science) who have, with Professor Mike Murphy (MRC Mitochrondrial Biology Unit), been awarded a £1.3m grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to...

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Baby rat

Simple treatment during pregnancy can protect baby from memory problems in later life, study in rats suggests

21 April 2021

A new study in laboratory rats has discovered a direct link between low oxygen in the womb and impaired memory function in the adult offspring. It also finds that anti-oxidant supplements during pregnancy may protect against this. Low oxygen in the womb - known as chronic fetal hypoxia - is one of the most common...

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Cover image from Christina Weis, 'Surrogacy in Russia. An ethnography of reproductive labour, stratification and migration'

Comparative ethnographies of surrogacy: perceptions of the clinical labour of surrogacy in Russia, the USA and India

20 April 2021

A new article published this month in Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters presents the results of a multinational ethnographic study to show how perceptions of ‘clinical labour’ such as surrogacy are shaped by local moral frameworks. Marcin Smietana (ReproSoc, Cambridge University) and colleagues Sharmila Rudrappa (...

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DNA

Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing

14 April 2021

CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing can lead to unintended mutations at the targeted section of DNA in early human embryos, researchers have revealed. This highlights the need for further research into the effects of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, especially when used to edit human DNA in laboratory research. CRISPR-Cas9 genome...

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Ageing eggs

Single-cell technique could provide ‘egg health’ indicators

24 November 2020

Using the power of single-cell analysis, researchers at the Babraham Institute have assessed the effects of age on egg cells (oocytes) in mice, particularly looking to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that relate to reduced developmental competence. The knowledge uncovered by this research provides new insights into...

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Fluorescent images of embryos at the morula and blastocyst stages

Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise

9 October 2020

The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. This new finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-...

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An Evenings Invitation; with a Wink from the Bagnio (1773)

One in five Georgian Londoners had syphilis by the age of 35

18 September 2020

250 years ago, over one-fifth of Londoners had contracted syphilis by their 35th birthday, historians have calculated in a study that offers the first robust estimate of the amount of syphilis infection in London’s population in the later eighteenth century. The same study shows that Georgian Londoners were over twice as...

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Wolf Reik

Professor Wolf Reik receives an ERC Advanced Grant to study crucial developmental process

6 April 2020

New funding awarded to Professor Wolf Reik will support research into how the epigenetic landscape in early development impacts gastrulation, one of the earliest and most important processes in early development. This knowledge will inform strategies for regenerative medicine based on the use of stem cells, and improve our understanding of how developmental disorders arise in humans.

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About us

This Strategic Research Initiative explores the urgent challenges posed by reproduction today.

We facilitate close engagement between the arts, humanities and social sciences, biology and medicine. By approaching reproduction collectively and across disciplines, we offer fresh perspectives on broad issues which range from global policies to those which affect individuals, families and populations.

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Latest news

Cambridge scientists awarded £1.3m to unravel how cardiovascular disease is programmed by obese pregnancy

26 April 2021

Congratulations to SRI members Professor Dino Giussani (Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience) and Professor Sue Ozanne (Wellcome-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science) who have, with Professor Mike Murphy (MRC Mitochrondrial Biology Unit), been awarded a £1.3m grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to...

Simple treatment during pregnancy can protect baby from memory problems in later life, study in rats suggests

21 April 2021

A new study in laboratory rats has discovered a direct link between low oxygen in the womb and impaired memory function in the adult offspring. It also finds that anti-oxidant supplements during pregnancy may protect against this. Low oxygen in the womb - known as chronic fetal hypoxia - is one of the most common...

Comparative ethnographies of surrogacy: perceptions of the clinical labour of surrogacy in Russia, the USA and India

20 April 2021

A new article published this month in Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters presents the results of a multinational ethnographic study to show how perceptions of ‘clinical labour’ such as surrogacy are shaped by local moral frameworks. Marcin Smietana (ReproSoc, Cambridge University) and colleagues Sharmila Rudrappa (...

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